Air Scrubber Calculator – How Many Air Scrubbers Do You Need?

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll demystify the science of air scrubbing, introduce you to our user-friendly air scrubber calculator, and walk you through real-world applications.

Air Scrubber Calculator

Enter the length of the room in feet.

Enter the width of the room in feet.

Enter the height of the room in feet.

Enter the desired number of air changes per hour. This is the number of times the total volume of air in the room is replaced each hour.

Select the model of air scrubber you are using. The CFM (cubic feet per minute) for each model is listed in parentheses.

Result

Instructions – How to Use the Calculator

  1. Enter Room Dimensions: In the provided fields, input the length, width, and height of the room you wish to clean with the air scrubber. These measurements should be in feet.
  2. Specify Air Changes per Hour (ACH): Input the desired number of air changes per hour. This is the number of times the total volume of air in the room is replaced each hour. The recommended ACH can vary depending on the specific requirements of the space.
  3. Select Air Scrubber Model: Choose the model of the air scrubber you are using or considering to use from the dropdown menu. The models are listed with their CFM (Cubic Feet per Minute) ratings, which indicate the volume of air they can clean in a minute.
  4. Calculate: Click the “Calculate” button. The calculator will display the volume of the room, the required CFM to achieve the desired ACH, the treatment volume that the selected air scrubber model can handle, and the number of air scrubbers needed.

Understanding the Input Parameters

The calculator has a few different input parameters. Here’s what each one means:

  • CFM: This is the Cubic Feet per Minute rating of your air scrubber. It tells you how much air the scrubber can clean in a minute. You can usually find this information in the product specifications of the air scrubber.
  • ACH: This is the Air Changes per Hour you want to achieve. It’s a measure of how many times the air in the room is replaced with clean air in an hour. The ideal ACH can vary depending on the space and its use.
  • Room Length, Width, and Height: These are the dimensions of your room. You’ll need to measure these and input them in feet. The calculator uses these dimensions to calculate the volume of the room.

Interpreting the Results

After you hit ‘Calculate’, the calculator will provide two results:

  • Treatment Volume: This is the volume of air that your air scrubber can effectively clean in one hour. It’s calculated based on the CFM of the air scrubber and the desired ACH.
  • Air Scrubbers Needed: This is the number of air scrubbers you need to achieve your desired ACH in the room. If this number isn’t a whole number, you should round up to ensure you have enough air scrubbing capacity.

How the Air Scrubber Calculator Works

Now that you know how to use the air scrubber calculator, let’s take a closer look at how it works. Don’t worry, we won’t get too technical. But understanding the math behind the calculator can help you better understand your air scrubbing needs.

The Math Behind the Calculator

The calculator uses a few simple formulas to estimate the treatment volume and the number of air scrubbers needed. Here’s how it works:

  • Calculating Room Volume: The calculator multiplies the length, width, and height of the room to calculate its volume in cubic feet.
  • Calculating Treatment Volume: The calculator multiplies the CFM of the air scrubber by 60 (to convert minutes to hours) and divides by the desired ACH. This gives the volume of air that the air scrubber can effectively clean in one hour.
  • Calculating Air Scrubbers Needed: The calculator divides the volume of the room by the treatment volume to estimate the number of air scrubbers needed. If this number isn’t a whole number, it’s rounded up to ensure you have enough air scrubbing capacity.

How the Calculator Estimates Treatment Volume and Air Scrubbers Needed

The calculator estimates the treatment volume and the number of air scrubbers needed based on the input parameters you provide. It assumes that the air scrubber is running continuously and that the room is a simple rectangular shape.

Keep in mind that these are just estimates. The actual number of air scrubbers you need may vary depending on factors like the layout of the room, the presence of obstacles that could obstruct airflow, and the specific air quality challenges you’re facing.

Understanding the Importance of Air Scrubbers

Air scrubbers are more than just a fancy piece of tech. They play a crucial role in maintaining a healthy indoor environment by removing pollutants from the air. Whether it’s dust, mold spores, or chemical fumes, air scrubbers are designed to tackle it all. They’re especially important in spaces where air quality is a top priority, like hospitals, labs, or your home!

The Purpose of this Comprehensive Guide

This guide aims to be your go-to resource for all things air scrubber-related. We’ll cover the basics, dive into the science behind how air scrubbers work, and even provide a handy calculator to help you figure out your specific needs. By the end of this guide, you’ll be an air scrubber pro!

Who Can Use This Calculator?

Our air scrubber calculator is designed to be user-friendly and accessible to a wide range of users. Whether you’re a homeowner looking to improve the air quality in your living space, a business owner seeking to provide a healthier environment for your employees, or a professional in the HVAC or mold remediation industry, this tool can be incredibly useful. Here’s a closer look at who can benefit from our calculator:

Homeowners: If you’re concerned about indoor pollutants, allergens, or mold spores in your home, our calculator can help you determine the right air scrubber for your needs. By inputting your room dimensions and desired air changes per hour (ACH), you can find out the cubic feet per minute (CFM) your air scrubber needs to have and how many air scrubbers you might need.

Business Owners and Facility Managers: Maintaining good indoor air quality is crucial in workplaces, schools, hospitals, and other facilities. Our calculator can help you determine the air scrubbing needs of your space, helping you create a healthier environment for your employees, students, or patients.

HVAC Professionals: If you’re in the business of installing and maintaining HVAC systems, our calculator can be a valuable tool in your arsenal. It can help you provide accurate recommendations to your clients on the type and number of air scrubbers they need.

Mold Remediation Specialists: During mold remediation, air scrubbers are used to filter out mold spores and prevent them from spreading. Our calculator can help you determine the right air scrubber for the job, based on the size of the space and the desired ACH.

In short, anyone who is interested in improving indoor air quality can benefit from using our air scrubber calculator. It’s a simple tool that can make a big difference in your air quality management efforts.

Understanding Air Scrubbers

Before we get into the nitty-gritty, let’s start with the basics. What exactly is an air scrubber, and how does it work?

What is an Air Scrubber?

An air scrubber is a device that removes particles, gases, and chemicals from the air within a specific area. Think of it as a super-powered air purifier. While air purifiers are great for removing common allergens like dust and pet dander, air scrubbers go a step further. They can tackle more serious pollutants like mold spores, bacteria, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

How Does an Air Scrubber Work?

Air scrubbers clean the air using a process called ‘scrubbing’. Here’s how it works: the air scrubber pulls in air from the surrounding environment. This air then passes through a series of filters that trap and remove pollutants. The clean air is then released back into the room. Pretty neat, right?

Different Types of Air Scrubbers

There are several types of air scrubbers, each designed to tackle specific types of pollutants. Some use physical filters, while others use chemical reactions or UV light to kill or neutralize pollutants. The type of air scrubber you need will depend on the specific air quality challenges you’re facing.

The Importance of Air Scrubbers in Indoor Air Quality

Indoor air quality is a big deal. We spend a lot of our time indoors, and the air we breathe can have a significant impact on our health and well-being. Air scrubbers play a key role in maintaining good indoor air quality by removing pollutants that other devices can’t. Whether you’re dealing with mold, chemical fumes, or bacteria, an air scrubber can help keep your indoor air clean and healthy.

The Science Behind Air Scrubbing

Alright, now that we’ve covered the basics, let’s dive a little deeper. Understanding the science behind air scrubbing can help you make more informed decisions about your air quality needs. So, let’s get to it!

The Role of CFM in Air Scrubbing

First up, let’s talk about CFM, or Cubic Feet per Minute. This is a measure of how much air can move through a system in one minute. In the context of air scrubbers, it tells us how much air the device can clean in a minute.

The higher the CFM, the more air the scrubber can clean, and the larger the space it can handle. So, if you’re looking to clean a large room or a room with a lot of pollutants, you’ll want an air scrubber with a high CFM.

Understanding Air Changes per Hour (ACH)

Next up is ACH, or Air Changes per Hour. This is a measure of how many times the air in a room is replaced with clean air in an hour. The higher the ACH, the cleaner the air.

The recommended ACH can vary depending on the space. For example, a hospital operating room might require a higher ACH than a home living room. Our air scrubber calculator (which we’ll get to in a bit) allows you to input your desired ACH to calculate your specific needs.

The Concept of Treatment Volume in Air Scrubbing

Finally, let’s talk about treatment volume. This is the volume of air that an air scrubber can effectively clean in one hour. It’s calculated by multiplying the CFM of the air scrubber by 60 (to convert minutes to hours) and dividing by the ACH.

Understanding treatment volume can help you determine how many air scrubbers you need for a specific space. But don’t worry, our calculator will do the math for you!

Choosing the Right Air Scrubber: Factors to Consider

Now that you know how to calculate your air scrubbing needs, the next step is choosing the right air scrubber. But with so many models on the market, how do you know which one is right for you? Let’s discuss some key factors to consider.

Understanding Different Air Scrubber Models

Air scrubbers come in all shapes and sizes, each designed to tackle specific types of pollutants. Here are a few common types:

  • HEPA Air Scrubbers: These use High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters to remove small particles from the air. They’re great for tackling dust, mold spores, and other allergens.
  • Activated Carbon Air Scrubbers: These use activated carbon filters to remove gases and odors from the air. They’re ideal for spaces where chemical fumes or unpleasant odors are a concern.
  • UV Air Scrubbers: These use ultraviolet light to kill or neutralize bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms. They’re a good choice for spaces where germ control is a priority.

When choosing an air scrubber model, consider the specific air quality challenges you’re facing. You may even need a combination of different types to effectively clean your air.

Assessing Your Specific Needs: CFM, ACH, and Treatment Volume

Once you understand the different air scrubber models, the next step is assessing your specific needs. This is where our air scrubber calculator comes in handy!

  • CFM: Consider the CFM rating of the air scrubber. The higher the CFM, the more air it can clean, and the larger the space it can handle.
  • ACH: Determine your desired ACH. This will depend on the space and its use. For example, a hospital operating room might require a higher ACH than a home living room.
  • Treatment Volume: Use the calculator to estimate the treatment volume and the number of air scrubbers needed based on your CFM and ACH.

Remember, these are just estimates. The actual number of air scrubbers you need may vary depending on other factors like the layout of the room and the presence of obstacles that could obstruct airflow.

Comparing Different Air Scrubber Models

ModelCFMSuitable for Room Size (sq ft)Ideal for
Model A500Up to 2000Small offices, homes
Model B10002000 – 4000Medium-sized offices, large homes
Model C15004000 – 6000Large offices, small warehouses
Model D20006000 and aboveLarge warehouses, industrial spaces

Choosing the right air scrubber can seem daunting, but with the right information and tools, it doesn’t have to be. In the next section, we’ll walk through a real-world example of how to use the air scrubber calculator.

Case Study 1: Real Application of Air Scrubber Calculator

To help you better understand how to use the air scrubber calculator and apply its results, let’s walk through a real-world example.

Scenario Description

Let’s say you’re the manager of a large office building. You’ve been receiving complaints about poor air quality, and you’ve decided to install air scrubbers to address the issue. The office is a large open space measuring 60 feet in length, 40 feet in width, and 10 feet in height. You’ve chosen an air scrubber model with a CFM of 500, and you want to achieve an ACH of 4.

Using the Calculator: A Walkthrough

Here’s how you’d use the calculator in this scenario:

  1. Input the CFM: Enter 500 in the CFM field.
  2. Input the ACH: Enter 4 in the ACH field.
  3. Input the Room Dimensions: Enter 60 in the Length field, 40 in the Width field, and 10 in the Height field.
  4. Hit ‘Calculate’: Click the ‘Calculate’ button to get your results.

Interpreting and Applying the Results

The calculator will provide two results:

  • Treatment Volume: This is the volume of air that your air scrubber can effectively clean in one hour. In this case, the calculator estimates a treatment volume of 7,500 cubic feet.
  • Air Scrubbers Needed: This is the number of air scrubbers you need to achieve your desired ACH in the room. In this case, the calculator estimates that you need 3 air scrubbers.

With these results, you can make an informed decision about how many air scrubbers to purchase and where to place them in the office for optimal air cleaning.

Case Study 2: Using the Air Scrubber Calculator for Mold Removal

Let’s take a look at another real-world application of the air scrubber calculator, this time focusing on a mold removal scenario.

Scenario Description

Imagine you’re a homeowner who has recently discovered a mold problem in your basement. The basement measures 30 feet in length, 20 feet in width, and 8 feet in height. You’ve decided to rent a HEPA air scrubber to help with the mold remediation process. The air scrubber has a CFM of 600, and you want to achieve an ACH of 6 to ensure thorough air cleaning.

Using the Calculator: A Walkthrough

Here’s how you’d use the calculator in this scenario:

  1. Input the CFM: Enter 600 in the CFM field.
  2. Input the ACH: Enter 6 in the ACH field.
  3. Input the Room Dimensions: Enter 30 in the Length field, 20 in the Width field, and 8 in the Height field.
  4. Hit ‘Calculate’: Click the ‘Calculate’ button to get your results.

Interpreting and Applying the Results

The calculator will provide two results:

  • Treatment Volume: This is the volume of air that your air scrubber can effectively clean in one hour. In this case, the calculator estimates a treatment volume of 6,000 cubic feet.
  • Air Scrubbers Needed: This is the number of air scrubbers you need to achieve your desired ACH in the room. In this case, the calculator estimates that you need 1 air scrubber.

With these results, you can proceed with your mold remediation process, knowing that the air scrubber you’ve rented is sufficient for the size of your basement and your desired ACH.

Remember, dealing with mold can be a serious issue, and while an air scrubber can help clean the air, it’s important to also address the source of the mold problem to prevent future growth.

FAQ

Can I use the air scrubber calculator for any room size?

Yes, our calculator is designed to handle any room size. Just input the correct dimensions and it will provide accurate results.

How often should I run my air scrubber?

The frequency of running your air scrubber depends on the air quality in your space. If you’re dealing with a high level of pollutants or a large space, you might need to run it more often.

What is the lifespan of an air scrubber?

The lifespan of an air scrubber varies depending on the model and how often it’s used. Regular maintenance can also extend its lifespan.

Can air scrubbers remove all types of pollutants?

Air scrubbers are designed to remove a wide range of pollutants, including dust, mold, bacteria, and more. However, their effectiveness can vary depending on the specific pollutant and the model of the air scrubber.

Conclusion

We’ve covered a lot of ground in this comprehensive guide, haven’t we? From understanding the basics of air scrubbers and the science behind air scrubbing, to learning how to use our air scrubber calculator and applying it in real-world scenarios.

Proper air scrubbing is crucial for maintaining a healthy indoor environment, whether it’s in a home, office, hospital, or any other indoor space. It helps remove pollutants, allergens, and microorganisms from the air, contributing to better respiratory health and overall well-being.

Using the correct calculations when choosing and using an air scrubber is equally important. It ensures that the air scrubber is capable of effectively cleaning the air in the space, achieving the desired ACH, and providing the best possible indoor air quality.

Our air scrubber calculator simplifies these calculations, making it easier for you to make informed decisions about your air scrubbing needs. We hope you find it useful and that it helps you achieve your air quality goals.

Additional Resources

  1. What is a HEPA filter? | US EPA
  2. Air pollution | World Health Organization
  3. Indoor Air Quality | Occupational Safety and Health Administration

About the author

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Brad Smith

Brad Smith is an experienced interior designer and the founder of OmniHomeIdeas.com. With a Master's degree in Interior Design from Pratt Institute and a passion for creating safe and healthy living spaces, Brad shares his expert insights and innovative design ideas with our readers. His work is driven by the belief that home is where every story begins.

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